Last edited by Nikojora
Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

6 edition of Inert Gases in the Control of Museum Insect Pests (Research in Conservation) found in the catalog.

Inert Gases in the Control of Museum Insect Pests (Research in Conservation)

by Charles Selwitz

  • 277 Want to read
  • 8 Currently reading

Published by Getty Trust Publications: Getty Conservation Institute .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Conservation, restoration & care of artworks,
  • Museums & Museology,
  • Technology: General Issues,
  • Collections, Catalogs, Exhibitions - General,
  • Art,
  • Conservation and restoration,
  • Control,
  • Insect pests,
  • Museum conservation methods,
  • Museum exhibits,
  • Research

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages150
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL11298557M
    ISBN 100892365021
    ISBN 109780892365029

      Selwitz C, Maekawa S () Inert gases in the control of museum insect pests. Research in conservation. The Getty Conservation Institute, Los Cited by: 2. Although mould and insect attack are treated separately in this section it is most important that pest control is dealt with in a coordinated fashion. Pest management should be a routine part of the operations associated with a collection not just a series of responses to crises. using inert gases, low oxygen or chemical techniques.

    Inert gases in the control of museum insect pests. Book: USA: Research in Conservation. The Getty Conservation Institute, pp. English: Smith R D: The use of redesigned and mechanically modified commercial freezers to dry waterwetted books and exterminate insects. Paper: Restaurator 6, pp. English: Smith R D: Although mould and insect attack are treated separately in this section it is most important that pest control is dealt with in a coordinated fashion. using inert gases, low oxygen or chemical techniques. The use of oxygen-free environments in the control of museum pests, Getty Publications, Los Angeles, California, pp. Pearson, C.

    book conservator's shelf to assist not only in clarifying terminology but also in the decision-making process for treatment of historic bindings. Donia Conn Vieste Terrace Fremont, Calif. CHARLES SELWITZ and SHIN MAEKAWA, INERT GASES IN THE CONTROL OF MUSEUM INSECT PESTS. Los Angeles: Getty Conservation Institute, pages. "The effects of low oxigen atmospheres on museum pests", en Studies in Conservation, , vol. 36, nº 2, Guiomar, Maria; Wiendl, Federico M., "The applicability of gamma radiation to the control of fungi in naturally contamined paper", en Restaurator, , vol. 16, nº 2, pgs.


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Inert Gases in the Control of Museum Insect Pests (Research in Conservation) by Charles Selwitz Download PDF EPUB FB2

Inert Cases in the Control of Museum Insect Pests is a compendium of informa- tion on the biological mechanisms by which nontoxic gases kill insects; the methods and materials needed to create and maintain an anoxic atmosphere.

Request PDF | Inert Gases in the Control of Museum Insect Pests | A serious problem facing museum professionals is the protection of collections from damage due to insects. This book describes. A serious problem facing museum professionals is the protection of collections from damage due to insects.

This book describes successful insect eradication procedures developed at the Getty Conservation Institute and elsewhere, whereby objects are held in an atmosphere of either nitrogen or argon containing less than ppm of oxygen—a process known as anoxia or oxygen.

This work details the use of inert gases in the control of museum insect pests. Successful insect eradication procedures using a process known as anoxia are described, and instructions for building and upgrading treatment systems are included.

Download A serious problem facing museum professionals is the protection of collections from damage due to insects. This book describes successful insect eradication procedures developed at the Getty Conservation Institute and elsewhere, whereby objects are held in an atmosphere of either nitrogen or argon containing less than ppm of oxygen—a process known as anoxia—or in an.

Description Charles Selwitz and Shin Maekawa A serious problem facing museum professionals is the protection of collections from damage due to insects. This book describes successful insect eradication procedures developed at the Getty Conservation Institute and elsewhere, whereby objects are held in.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Yale University Press, New Haven, Met Objectives. “Biodeterioration in Museum Collections” Sherman Fairchild Center for Objects Conservation.

Metropolitan Museum of Art. 3(2). Selwitz, C. and S. Maekawa Inert Gases in the Control of Museum Insect Pests. A serious problem facing museum professionals is the protection of collections from damage due to insects.

This book describes successful insect eradication procedures developed at the Getty Conservation Institute and elsewhere, whereby objects are held in an atmosphere of either nitrogen or argon containing less than ppm of oxygen—a process known as anoxia—or in an atmosphere of.

Shin Maekawa, coauthor of Inert Gases in the Control of Museum Insect Pests (Getty Publications, ) and editor of Oxygen-Free Museum Cases (Getty Publications, ), is a senior scientist at the Getty Conservation Institute.

Kerstin Elert is a research fellow at the University of Granada, Spain. Museums throughout the world face the challenge of finding nontoxic methods to control insect pests. This book focuses on practical rather than theoretical issues in the use of oxygen-free environments, presenting a detailed, hands-on guide to the use of oxygen-free environments in the eradication of museum insect pests.

This book is about one option, the use of nontoxic gases (argon, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide) to rid museum objects of insect pests. Conservators are selecting this approach because they feel more comfortable and confident that using inert gases is much less likely to. Museum integrated pest management is the practice of monitoring and managing pest and environmental information with pest control methods to prevent pest damage to collections and cultural ving cultural heritage is the ultimate goal for most museum collection personnel.

Museum pests come in many different forms: insects, mites, rodents, bats, birds, and fungi and the two most. Inert Gases in the Control of Museum Insect Pests Lightsense Corporation, The Getty Conservation Institute Lawrence S.

Ring, Wayne E. Rodgers, Shin Maekawa, Frank Preusser, Vinod Daniel, IPM Associates, Inc Introduction to Integrated Pest Management (IPM) for "Urban" Landscapes Integrated Pest Management Working Group Inert Gases in the Control of Museum Insect PestsInert Gases in the Control of Museum Insect Pests, Research in Conservation.

Los Angeles: Getty Conservation Institute, A technical discussion of the use of inert gases for insect control. Includes the methods and materials required for the anoxic treatment of museum objects.

Gilberg, M. “Inert Atmosphere Fumigation of Museum Objects.” Studies in Conservation 34 (). Gilberg, Mark. “The Effects of Low Oxygen Atmospheres on Museum Pests.” Studies in Conservation 36 (): Gorham, J. Insect and Mite Pests in Food, An Illustrated Key, Vol.

Volumes 1 & 2. Washington, D.C.: United States Department. The Feasibility of Using Modified Atmospheres to Control Insect Pests in Museums MICHAEL K. RUST, VINOD DANIEL, JAMES R. DRUZIK, and FRANK D. PREUSSER Restaurator,Vol Number 1Cited by: They are found in nature on the bark of trees and shrubs, preferring damp, warm, undisturbed environments.

In museum settings, they can commonly be found in books and book bindings, storage boxes, paper goods and herbaria collections. Life Cycle: Psocids undergo simple metamorphosis to develop to maturity. Eggs will hatch 21 days after being laid. A discussion of the types of pests and how to control them: covers fleas, cockroaches, flies, ants, pantry pests, clothes moths, silverfish, rodents, termites and spiders.

Geared to the household. Harmon, James D. Integrated Pest Management in Museum, Library and Archival Facilities: A Step by Step Approach for the Design, Development.

The bubble was evac- Insect control in museum, archive and herbarium collections uated using a vacuum pump and then refilled with inert gas. The temperature was maintained at and the RH at % for 12 by: Inert Gases in the Control of Museum Insect Pests (Los Angeles: Getty Conservation Institute, c), by Charles Selwitz and Shin Maekawa (PDF and page images at and Google) Filed under: Insect pests -- Control -- United States.

Insect pests are responsible for substantial damage to museum objects, historic books and in buildings like palaces or historic houses. Different wood boring beetles (Anobium punctatum, Hylotrupes bajulus, Lyctus sp. or introduced species), the biscuit beetle (Stegobium paniceum), the cigarette beetle (Lasioderma serricorne), different Dermestides (Attagenus sp., Anthrenus sp., Cited by: V ALENTIN N., P REUSSER F., - Insect control by inert gases in museums archives and archives.

Restaurator, W EGENER G., - Hypoxia and post hypoxic recovery in insects.The Use of Oxygen-Free Environments in the Control of Museum Insect Pests (Tools for Conservation) [Maekawa, Shin, Elert, Kerstin] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Use of Oxygen-Free Environments in the Control of Museum Insect Pests (Tools for Conservation)Cited by: